Kershaw has appeared in more postseason games on short rest than games on regular rest.

Beltre’s third act, though, surpassed all expectations. He was 30 and inspiring columns about how he would be a mistake for his new team. He was known as a player with one great year and a bunch of middling ones, even if that wasn’t accounting for his defense. Now he’s 38, a member of the 3,000-hit club, and a clear first-ballot Hall of Famer.

It happened quickly. It happened so quickly. The best part is, though, that it’s still going and doesn’t have to stop for years. If Beltre could Julio Franco the heck out of the rest of his career, his Hall of Fame chances would be impervious. And our lives would be immeasurably better.

It was a good thing the Dodgers didn’t succumb to whatever temptations they had to face in previous deadlines, but the urgency has been beating under the floorboards, like The Tell-Tale Heart. It would be dandy if they won 120 games with the help of Alex Wood and Rich Hill, but that wasn’t going to be a guarantee of postseason success. One rough start for Wood in the NLDS and one gnarly blister for Hill, and the Dodgers were likely to be swimming in liquid regret, all over again. They would have to start Kershaw on short rest again, which is basically baseball’s version of Sideshow Bob stepping on rakes, spread out over a multiyear postseason history.
Game Womens Steven Nelson Jersey
Elite Womens Mitchell Marner Jersey The Dodgers’ entire plan was predicated around Kershaw being worked extra-hard in the postseason, and it kept failing. It was an unfair burden for Kershaw.

Not only did the Dodgers get Darvish to be the clear, unambiguous No. 2, they still have their other pitchers. They get to stack the rotation with Kershaw, Darvish, Wood, and Hill and not worry about short rest. They can load the bullpen up with one or two of Brandon McCarthy, Kenta Maeda, and Hyun-jin Ryu, mix and matching.